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Xanax Addiction

Xanax addiction is a very serious and sometimes life threatening dilemma. Not only is it difficult for the addict, it is extremely hard on those around them who care about them. For the addict, admitting they have an addiction problem can be difficult. However painful this may be, it must be acknowledged as the first gradient to overcoming the problem. The next hurdle is being willing to seek & accept help from an addiction professional. It can be hard for an addict to confront the fact that they can not do it alone. Once this fact is accepted, it is time to seek the appropriate professional treatment. Drug rehab programs based on the social education modality are highly successful. This means that individuals who are recovering from Xanax addiction are not made wrong for their past indiscretions, but are taught how to avoid future ones. They are provided with knowledge on how to change their lives and how to live comfortably without Xanax. Receiving treatment for addiction should be done in a safe & stable environment that is conducive to addiction recovery. Research studies show that residential treatment programs of at least 3 months in duration have the best success rates. 3 months may seem like a long time, but one day in the life of an individual addicted to Xanax can feel like an eternity. Addiction is a self imposed hellish slavery. The chains can be broken people do it everyday. You can be free!

Drug rehabilitation is a multi-phase, multi-faceted, long term process. Detoxification is only the first step on the road of addiction treatment. Physical detoxification alone is not sufficient to change the patterns of a drug addict. Recovery from addiction involves an extended process which usually requires the help of drug addiction professionals. To make a successful recovery, the addict needs new tools in order to deal with situations and problems which arise. Factors such as encountering someone from their days of using, returning to the same environment and places, or even small things such as smells and objects trigger memories which can create psychological stress. This can hinder the addict's goal of complete recovery, thus not allowing the addict to permanently regain control of his or her life.

Almost all addicts tell themselves in the beginning that they can conquer their addiction on their own without the help of outside resources. Unfortunately, this is not usually the case. When an addict makes an attempt at detoxification and to discontinue drug use without the aid of professional help, statistically the results do not last long. Research into the effects of long-term addiction has shown that substantial changes in the way the brain functions are present long after the addict has stopped using drugs. Realizing that a drug addict who wishes to recover from their addiction needs more than just strong will power is the key to a successful recovery. Battling not only cravings for their drug of choice, re-stimulation of their past and changes in the way their brain functions, it is no wonder that quitting drugs without professional help is an uphill battle.

As an organization we are dedicated to finding the correct solution for your specific addiction problem. Our referral list contains over 3,000 resources which encompass the following treatment categories :
  • Xanax Detox Center
  • Xanax Rehab
  • Xanax Treatment
  • Xanax Addiction Treatment
  • Xanax Addiction Counseling
  • Meetings
  • Xanax In-Patient Treatment
  • Xanax Out-Patient Treatment

  • Q) What is Xanax?

    A) Xanax is prescription tranquilizer which depresses the nervous system in a way similar to alcohol.

    Q) How is Xanax used?

    A) Xanax when abused is taken orally, chewed, crushed (then snorted like cocaine), or crushed (then dissolved in water and injected like heroin).

    Q) What are the effects of Xanax addiction?

    A) Xanax has depressant effects on brain areas that regulate wakefulness and alertness, very similar in effect to alcohol and sedative barbiturates. They enhance the action of receptors that inhibit central nervous system stimulation, and conversely, inhibit the action of receptors that stimulate the nervous system. In other words, if the nervous system were a car, these drugs help press down the brakes but make it harder to press down on the gas.

    • difficulty concentrating
    • "floating" or disconnected sensation
    • depressed heartbeat
    • depressed breathing
    • excessive sleep and sleepiness
    • mental confusion and memory loss
    • addiction

    Q) What are the symptoms of withdrawal?

    A) Essentially, withdrawal symptoms for the tranquilizers feel like the opposite of the therapeutic effects. The short-acting benzodiazapines (Xanax, Halcion, Restoril, Ativan, and Serax) can produce especially severe withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms, that are similar to those in alcohol withdrawal, include jittery, shaky feelings and any of the following:

    • rapid heartbeat
    • shaky hands
    • insomnia or disturbed sleep
    • sweating
    • irritability
    • anxiety and agitation

    Q) What is Xanax addiction?

    A) The tranquilizer, which was introduced in 1973, can become psychologically and physically addictive if taken in high doses for longer than eight weeks. Therefore, it should be - and usually is - prescribed as a temporary solution for people with stress and anxiety disorders, doctors say.

    But while addiction is Xanax's primary risk, there's another breed of abuser out there. Like other pharmaceuticals such as OxyContin and Ritalin, Xanax has found its way from pharmacies to drug dealers, and is being abused by young, healthy people who want to get high. These club-hopping, twentysomething, casual ``Xannie poppers'' are using the drug in combination with other stimulants, from booze to cocaine.

    Q) How offten is Xanax abused?

    A) It is estimated that in 1999, 4 million people were currently using prescription drugs non-medically. Nearly 5 million people have at one point taken Xanax or a similar anti-anxiety medication for nonmedicinal reasons, according to a 2000 survey conducted by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Possession of a prescription drug without proof of a prescription is a felony.

    More than 22,000 Xanax-related emergency-room visits were reported in the United States in 2000, up from 16,000 seven years before, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

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